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20121205
20121213
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)
's what i was. i mean, i had a little education along the way, i hope i learned something in the process. but i never expected to be asked to serve on the supreme court. i was very honored. i wasn't sure i should do it. i had never argued a case at the core, i had not been a law clerk at the court. >> did the president himself call you? >> he did. my phone wrong and it was ronald reagan an the phone. he said, sandra, i'd like to announce your nomination for the court tomorrow. frank lie my heart sang. >> really? >> it really did. because i was not at all sure that i could do the job well enough. i didn't know if i could. i told my husband and he said, oh, that's ridiculous, of course you can. and he was more certain and enthused than i was. >> then you came to washington and -- >> did i. >> do you think they treated you differently because you were a woman? >> well, they were very curious to meet me. those who didn't know me. number one, they were curious. number two, they weren't sure and number three, women are half of our voting population, aren't they? i think there was a certain hes
resources that have benefitted us in our life for our education and well-being, and we just want to be the bridge for letting that happen. that's by people who have their own capacity and dreams. >> a long road he admits where success is built one small stretch at a time. for religion and ethnics newsweekly, this is sam lazaro in hate hety. . >>> we talked this week to one of the most prominent leaders of the evangelical christian right. he's richard land, president of the southern baptist convention's ethics and religious liberty commission. land plans to retire from the commission next october after 25 years as an outspoken leader in the culture wars. many observers have seen in recent polls and in last month's election returns evidence of a decline in the influence of evangelical conservatives. a setback for the causes land has led. he concedes no such thing. >> i think it's not a fair reading. for instance, on the pro-life issue, a majority of americans now say that they are pro-life. >> iñr thought that legal abortn in almost all cases is favored? >> the question about whet
to address the educational demands of the mothers. these children are taking english classes. ♪ wednesday, thursday, friday >> reporter: both the government and the company pay for the center. employees can enroll their children for free. >> translator: because the child care center is in the building, i can look in o >> translator: we really value our female employees. we think that this child care system is the best way to support the parents and allow them to work without worrying about their kids. >> reporter: people will be watching to see whether this kind of support makes it easier for mothers to keep working. anna jung, nhk world, seoul. >>> famed brazilian architect oscar niemeyer, who designed his country's capital city as well as some of the world's most distinctive buildings is dead at 104. niemeyer was born in brazil in 1907. he began his career in the 1930s after graduating from a local university. he was one of the architects that designed the u.n. headquarters in new york, a project that began in 1947. in 1956, niemeyer created a series of landmark structures for brazil's
people without disabilities. across the world, people with disabilities have for help, lower educational achievement, less economic participation, and higher rates of poverty and people without disabilities. this unacceptable situation must change. >> california has formalized its refusal to ensure the enforcement of federal effort begin immigration requests. on tuesday, attorney general kamala harris said state agencies are not required to -- comply with the program known as secure communities, where local authorities share fingerprints with immigration officials. the program led to the record deportation of around 400,000 people last year. striking care for workers at the port of los angeles and long beach have reached a tentative agreement after an eight-day walkout. workers went on strike last week against international corporations who they say are outsourcing good paying jobs. the strike cost southern california a reported $8 billion in lost economic activity and marked the worst disruption of local cargo traffic in a decade. this is democracy now!, democracynow.org, the war and pe
, also dedicated further musical education and social justice around the world, i am pleased to have gustavo dudamel at this table for the first time. >> thank you. it is an honor. >> rose: my pleasure. >> huge honor. >> rose: we have been wanting to do this for a while. tell me about the music you have selected for the performance. >> yes. this is a festival called dos americas here in new york, and we decide to bring, you know, this amazing music that we have, this very latin, in a ways of irs stick but deep music by es at the vek, villalobos, by ar bon, carlos chavez, so for us it is very important to show the soul of our music also, also to play the strauss ballad, but especially, you know, our music. >> rose: tell me about the music of venezuela. >> well, look, what we are bringing is the -- i think it is the most important piece right in venezuela, by michael estevez and a piece for a big choir, two soloist, a tenor and a baritone. >> a huge orchestra, you can feel what is about our culture, you know the horrors, the importance of -- the importance of the land, of the place, of
four let's make sure that we're making the kind of investments in education and work force development, energy independence, infrastructure and research and development that ensures that we're innovating as we have in the past. >> rose: julianna goldman of bloomberg joins me from washington and she interviewed president obama on tuesday. that was an excerpt from her interview and i'm pleased to have her on this program. and congratulations first of all. >> charlie thanks very much. it was a great opportunity. >> rose: tell me how you found the president. not in terms of the sort of term temperment in terms of where his mind is set at this moment. >> there was a little bit of chitchat before we started the interview and i had the opportunity to congratulate him for the first time since his election. and i said you've been a little busy. he said yes no trip to disneyworld for me. so he seemed a little tired. he seemed a little frustrated at the pace of how these negotiations are going. but he also came across as the cool, calm, no drama obama that we've come to know from him as a candi
Search Results 0 to 10 of about 11 (some duplicates have been removed)